ESP Biography



CHRISTOPHER ERDMAN, Cornell Sophomore Studying Classics




Major: Classics

College/Employer: Cornell

Year of Graduation: 2017

Picture of Christopher Erdman

Brief Biographical Sketch:

I'm a sophomore, majoring in Classics in the College of Arts and Sciences. Classical history in particular has always been a lifelong interest of mine, but when I'm not reading Cicero or analyzing Caesar I run, practice the tenor sax, or watch way too much Japanese anime (often instead of studying)



Past Classes

  (Look at the class archive for more.)


The Fall of the Republic: How the Romans Lost Their Liberty in Splash Spring 2016
Throughout the 1st Century, B.C. the Roman world was rocked by social and political turmoil. By the end of the century the emperor Augustus had risen as the sole political power in Rome, ending the political freedom of the Republic. How did the Romans, who prized freedom above all else, let their society completely fall apart? This course intends to lay out the key focal points in the socio-political struggle, and analyze the motives and desires of the people who drove this cataclysmic change in Roman society Basic understanding of Roman political and social structure recommended but not advised. We'll be going over thing's like what the senate did and what the patricians and plebeians were, but the more basic familiarity the better, since it lets us get to the juicy stuff!


The Fall of the Republic Part II: The Civil Wars in Splash Spring 2016
The collapse of Roman society in the 1st Century, B.C. coincided with the rise of powerful, politically-minded individuals. Seizing upon the disorder of the socio-political structure, men like Julius Caesar and Gnaeus Pompey fought for political control over the state, building up power through civil and military means. As rival politicians increasingly came into conflict the Roman world would be torn apart by nearly half a century of bloody civil war, from which only one man would emerge standing. Continuing where H73 (The Fall of the Republic: How the Romans Lost Their Liberty) left off, this course will lay out the events leading to the Roman civil wars and will follow their course, leading to the ascension of the first emperor Augustus. Part I is advised for the fullest possible understanding of the content, but is not required


The Fall of the Republic: How the Romans Lost Their Liberty in Splash Fall 2015
Throughout the 1st Century, B.C. the Roman world was rocked by social and political turmoil. By the end of the century the emperor Augustus had risen as the sole political power in Rome, ending the political freedom of the Republic. How did the Romans, who prized freedom above all else, let their society completely fall apart? This course intends to lay out the key focal points in the socio-political struggle, and analyze the motives and desires of the people who drove this cataclysmic change in Roman society Basic understanding of Roman political and social structure recommended but not advised. We'll be going over thing's like what the senate did and what the patricians and plebeians were, but the more basic familiarity the better, since it lets us get to the juicy stuff!


The Fall of the Republic Part II: The Civil Wars in Splash Fall 2015
The collapse of Roman society in the 1st Century, B.C. coincided with the rise of powerful, politically-minded individuals. Seizing upon the disorder of the socio-political structure, men like Julius Caesar and Gnaeus Pompey fought for political control over the state, building up power through civil and military means. As rival politicians increasingly came into conflict the Roman world would be torn apart by nearly half a century of bloody civil war, from which only one man would emerge standing. Continuing where H73 (The Fall of the Republic: How the Romans Lost Their Liberty) left off, this course will lay out the events leading to the Roman civil wars and will follow their course, leading to the ascension of the first emperor Augustus. Part I is advised for the fullest possible understanding of the content, but is not required


The Fall of the Republic: How the Romans Lost Their Liberty in Splash Spring 2015
Throughout the 1st Century, B.C. the Roman world was rocked by social and political turmoil. By the end of the century the emperor Augustus had risen as the sole political power in Rome, ending the political freedom of the Republic. How did the Romans, who prized freedom above all else, let their society completely fall apart? This course intends to lay out the key focal points in the socio-political struggle, and analyze the motives and desires of the people who drove this cataclysmic change in Roman society Basic understanding of Roman political and social structure recommended but not required. We'll be going over things like what the senate did and what the patricians and plebeians were, but the more basic familiarity the better, since it lets us get to the juicy stuff!


The Fall of the Republic Part II: The Civil Wars in Splash Spring 2015
The collapse of Roman society in the 1st Century, B.C. coincided with the rise of powerful, politically-minded individuals. Seizing upon the disorder of the socio-political structure, men like Julius Caesar and Gnaeus Pompey fought for political control over the state, building up power through civil and military means. As rival politicians increasingly came into conflict the Roman world would be torn apart by nearly half a century of bloody civil war, from which only one man would emerge standing. Continuing where H73 (The Fall of the Republic: How the Romans Lost Their Liberty) left off, this course will lay out the events leading to the Roman civil wars and will follow their course, leading to the ascension of the first emperor Augustus. Part I is advised for the fullest possible understanding of the content, but is not required


The Fall of the Republic: How the Romans Lost Their Liberty in Splash Fall 2014
Throughout the 1st Century, B.C. the Roman world was rocked by social and political turmoil. By the end of the century the emperor Augustus had risen as the sole political power in Rome, ending the political freedom of the Republic. How did the Romans, who prized freedom above all else, let their society completely fall apart? This course intends to lay out the key focal points in the socio-political struggle, and analyze the motives and desires of the people who drove this cataclysmic change in Roman society Basic understanding of Roman political and social structure recommended but not advised. We'll be going over thing's like what the senate did and what the patricians and plebeians were, but the more basic familiarity the better, since it lets us get to the juicy stuff!